Message Music – Augustus Pablo – Pressure Sounds


Message Music
Augustus Pablo

Why oh why is the track listing in this order, a weak track and the dub as tracks one and two don’t help this get off to a very good start, and then….. Pablo entering the digikal age…. nice, but not earth shaking overall.

There are some tuf tuff tunes here, none of which I’d ever heard and more than a handful got me rocking to and fro in the shed from which I listen and write, it’s stricly a taste thing though, not a quality thing, so I urge you to check out some sound samples and consider a trip to your friendly online Reggae vendor (Hell all the high street ones are all but gone!). Strictly speaking it’s ‘a make your own mind up deal’, personally it’s a hit and sometimes miss affair, but don’t let me put you off… hell what do I know, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, unless you’re Jordan of course and then beauty is a long forgotten memory doused by a tidal wave of silicon and the faint whiff of desperation….

Due release on 11/7/2011

Here follow the notes from Pressure Sounds for the release thussly sent as promo to the house of Bigmikeydread Reggae Radio and herwithineth shared with thee…. make up your own mind, but I’m listening to it now and if you loikes yer dub, then this one be for you…

In the 70s Augustus Pablo seemed to appear, like a vision from another world. His music was ethereal, evocative, and unique. There has not really been anyone like him, before or since. His music was deeply meditative, conjuring up all sorts of mystical and exotic images, but imbued with the dignity inherent in his Rastafarian faith. He now stands recognized as Jamaican music’s best-known lead instrumentalist.

By the mid 1980s Pablo had become a lot more ‘visible’, a lot less fashionable and a little of his ‘mystique’ had rubbed off. In the 1970s his own music sold in vast quantities for reggae product and he became a mainstay as an instrumentalist session player on many Jamaican recordings. In tandem with this session work he built a unique catalogue of music for a variety of his own labels such as Rockers, Rockers International, Message and Yard. ‘Message Music’ deals with Pablo’s instrumentals and dubs from around the mid-80s to the 90s as we think it is time to present a re-examination of this slightly overlooked period of his musical output.

As a creator of instrumental music he was often at odds with the spirit of the times, which was for the most part dominated by the sound and agenda of the Jamaican dancehall. That scene did not really suit ethereal instrumentals. Pablo, ever the individual, kept his own productions alive by producing roots vocalists and getting to grips with the new sounds at his disposal. He still played melodica when he felt the inspiration and on tracks such as ‘Missing Link’ and ‘Credential’ are superb ‘digital’ instrumentals. His dubs and and versions where stripped down mixes of his work with vocalists such as Yami Bolo, Junior Delgado and Willie Williams.

Dubs on this set such as ‘Revolution Dub’ the version of Delgado’s song ‘Forward Revolution’ deliver all the sonic force of Pablo’s classic 70s output. The Willie Williams song ‘Credential’ has one of Pablo’s great late period melodica instrumentals on the same rhythm. ‘Credential Instrumental’ is full of feeling and laid back blowing in that classic Pablo style so associated with his best music. Other dubs such as ‘A Java’ and ‘Butter Pon Dem Mouth’ are both re-workings of Pablo’s classic ‘Java’ instrumental. Digital in the best sense of the word. Both versions now back in demand with a younger audience possibly to young to remember the original!!

In essence this album is about an artist coming to terms with the digital or electronic age and still managing to maintain the main ingredient of what his music was all about. With the passing of time it’s time to recheck Pablo’s digital output and learn how he kept alive the inherent ‘message’ in his music. His musical spirit was second to none. A mighty artist and one of the few genuinely original instrumentalists to have emerged since the last golden age of jazz; he kept his musical legacy intact without resorting to gimmicks or becoming lost in what was undoubtedly a difficult time for him as an artist.

We have some rare Pablo photographs from David Corio as well as photographs from the Rockers International archive. Sleevenotes by Pete Holdsworth with 16 tracks spread over a superbly packaged cd or a double vinyl make this an essential album. There will also be 3 beautifully presented 45s taken from the album all especially re-mastered in custom made sleeves. The b sides from the 45s will not be on the album.

Classic music from one of the true greats of Jamaican Instrumental music.

No one who ever met this humble yet diffident character could ever doubt he was the ‘real thing’. He passed in May of 1999 but his music lives on.

TUNES ARE

A Java Instrumental (Version) – Augustus Pablo
Butter Pon Dem Mouth Version – Augustus Pablo
Ammagiddeon Dub – Augustus Pablo
Missing Link – Augustus Pablo
Missing Link Dub – Augustus Pablo
Credential Instrumental – Augustus Pablo
Culture Rule Dub – Rockers International Band
War Dub – Pablo All Stars
Run Come Yah Version – Augustus Pablo
Kidd Lane Specially – Augustus Pablo & Benbow
Anzania – Blacka Black – Augustus Pablo
Blacka Black Dub – Pablo All Stars
Revolution Dub – Pablo All Stars
Seven Winds From Zion – Augustus Pablo Isis
Addis Rock Dub – Rockers All Stars
Poor Mans Cry Dub – Rockers All Stars

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Father’s Day Top Ten Jamaican Songs


Cedric ‘Im Brooks and the Light of Saba – Song For My Father

Dennis Brown – Created By The Father

The Lyrics –  Hear What The Old Man Say

Pat Kelly – Daddy’s Home

Freddie McKay – Praising The Father

Lloyd and Patsy – Papa Do It Sweet

Luciano – Come Down Father

Derrick Morgan – Father Killam

The Maytals – Daddy

Sugar Minott – This Old Man

I want Record Shelving, something for my Lps and singles!


Ikea Expedit?

NOTE Ikea Expedit NOW UNAVAILABLE, AN EQUIVALENT WE ARE TOLD IS KALLAX – General opinion is that this new range will cope with records too. but i would personally excercise some caution.

I recently moved and needed to find storage for Lps, 12″ 10″ and 7″ singles that had been up in the Attic way too long.

I posted on a few forums and did some research, settling on the Ikea Expedit range as a possible answer to my storage woes; then I had my interest in the range confirmed by a number of people who like me are music obsessives. They too had either thought of purchasing or already had bought this shelving from Ikea for their collections.

Reasons to be cheerful?

Here are some reasons why this might work for you; 15″x15″ cubes (perfect for 12″ records), a 4×4 or 5×5 cube option, delivery of the flat packs by Ikea, a pretty easy build, which you could try on your own, but is better with two and a good look and finish.

Each cube is rated to take approximately 75Lps, though actually you could fit more in each 15″x15″ ‘hole’. Friends tell me that they have completely filled their shelves and the units have stayed solid over time, so you could, and I emphasise ‘could’ consider loading them up if your collection demands.

Putting them together is, pretty easy. At least I, and I’m not some drill toting DIY’er found it so.

They fix to the wall to prevent death and disaster and once they are, are very solid. Until that moment they like trying to to turn themselves into a parralellogram, so wall fixing is essential. Though they include what ammounts to a disclaimer in their instructions, they DO include brackets with your shelves’ ‘kit’.

They are not expensive and if you take the time to work out what they would cost you purely in materials let alone the time in design and construction, you’ll want to go for the buy it now option. Your wallet will probably agree as yet again Ikea sell lower than you could imagine and to boot they have a very nice finish quality for the money you’ll be paying.

Reasons to be tearful?

The delivery charge in the UK at £35 is a tad high I feel, considering the probablility that as large a corporation as Ikea most certainly is, they’d have other deliveries pretty close by and could ‘share’ those costs around a bit better.

When constructing mine, there were some minor defects. A small part of the lamination on a shelf had been dented and pushed up, most likely in manufacture; if I’d been really smart I could have hidden this by flipping the shelf and placing it the other way round, thus placing the ‘dent’ underneath and at the back of the shelf, unfortunately I didn’t. Doh!

Biggest Worry – Also and much more importantly, on one of the load bearing side panels some of the holes (3-4) prepared to receive the pegs from the shelving levels were not drilled properly and so the pegs move around within the holes designed to receive them; this means that they will not function properly in their load bearing capacity and if you are only shelving heavy vinyl records, this is most definately a concern.

Percy Sledge – Listen to him


He may not be the best singer you’ve ever heard, he might not have a 10th of the technical prowess of a Sam Cooke or a Maria Carey, but shit this man’s got soul.

Listen to Percy Sledge

I know it sounds strange and I’m going to keep it brief but if you, like I, passed the artist still known and not formerly whatsoever as Mr. Percy Sledge by, then go back, stare at him for a while and pick him up, give him a little shake to awaken him and listen… for this is one super soul brother.

The songs he sings would sit as well (and some did) in a Country star’s repetoire, songs like ‘It’s all wrong, but it’s all right’ will have you weeping into your ear buds and smiling to yourself in strange inward self huggings of a musical nature – while though you still are still unfortunately and visibly ‘a bit odd’ to the commuters that surround you’re ‘Sledging’ episodes.

Wow is this listners ear reaction, Wow is this now confirmed ‘Sledgster’s reaction, it’s . . . . beautiful, sublime, heartfelt and REAL, No cock posturing Timberlakian vocal acrobatics that mean sweet fuck all and purport to be ‘Soul Music’ or ‘R&B’ or whatever that chicken guts mess of mistaken identity is really all about, or really means to anyone with a true soul from this here one. Instead be prepared to hear the soulful yearnings of reality…

Check him out now!

 

Go Percy!

The Bristol Reggae Explosion 1978 – 1983


The Bristol Reggae Explosion 1978 – 1983

 

Interesting compilation coming out on Bristol Archive Records seeing an official release in the early part of next year, though it is available to purchase in advance here – http://bristolarchiverecords.bandcamp.com/album/the-bristol-reggae-explosion-1978-1983

I’ve got a promo copy for the car and have particularly enjoyed Ressurection’s – Four Point Plan, apparently Ressurection featured a young Rob Smith on guitar, he’s better known now as Smith of Smith N’ Mighty, reknowned remixers. Like a lot of good things, he hails from Bristol.

Bristol is and was one of the important musical and particularly Jamaican musical hotspots in the UK, and alongside Birmingham and London is was where it was all happening back in the day, check out your intro into the Bristolian affect on this release, heartily recommended.

Here is what the label says about it:

THE BRISTOL REGGAE EXPLOSION 1978-1983

Released on CD, VINYL and DIGITAL DOWNLOAD

Release date 21st February 2011

From Pop to Punk, the late seventies and early eighties saw a huge explosion in the number of local bands as more and more people thought they’d give it a go, new studios and independent labels weren’t far behind and Reggae wasn’t going to be left out of the musical mix.

If the majors were even aware of Bristol they showed minimal interest and it was left to the bands themselves and the handful of indie labels to document Bristol’s contribution to what was then a vibrant UK Reggae scene. Working on tight budgets and with no money for marketing campaigns local bands managed to release a small, but steady flow of vinyl, mostly pressed in tiny quantities and often sold direct to fans at gigs, these records, although cherished by those who own them, and sought by those in the know, have been largely ignored by the wider music industry.

Fortunately Bristol music has its own champion in the shape of Bristol Archive Records, a label with a mission to share our great musical heritage with the world, “The Bristol Reggae Explosion 1978-1983” is the first and only attempt to document the local Reggae scene from the late seventies until the early eighties. With the exception of the Black Roots tracks none of the recordings have ever been reissued and all were originally released before CD had been launched, so this is their debut in the digital format.

The music itself reflects the dominance of the Roots style in Bristol, even today Roots is by far the most popular type of Reggae in both the retail and live scenes locally, Black Roots live up to their name and show why they were the equal of any UK Reggae band in their day, Talisman, Restriction and 3D Production follow in their Roots footsteps, but a real highlight of this release is the inclusion of the ultra rare “Africa Is Our land” from Joshua Moses, a UK Roots classic. Bristol wasn’t all about Roots though and the other tracks follow a more mellow template, dealing with love and relationships, both Talisman and Joshua Moses show another side to their music and are joined by tracks from Buggs Durrant, The Radicals and Sharon Bengamin who’s “Mr. Guy” is a classic UK Lover’s track in the mould of Janet Kay, Carroll Thompson, Louisa Marks et al.

“The Bristol Reggae Explosion 1978-1983” will be released as a fourteen track CD, but you can’t have a proper Reggae release without it being on vinyl so there will be a very limited vinyl pressing featuring an eight track selection and just to keep things local the sleeve art is a mid-eighties carnival shot from Bristol’s own Beezer, (www.beezerphotos.com), featuring a classic image of Jah Revelation sound-system.
This release will shine the spotlight on a long neglected corner of the UK Reggae scene and Bristol’s musical heritage, the same music that would help underpin Bristol’s musical dominance in the following decade.
www.bristolarchiverecords.com

credits
released 21 February 2011
The Bristol Reggae Explosion 1978 – 1983

Track listing:

01. Black Roots : Bristol Rock (Bunny Marrett) (Arranged by Black Roots) p Nubian Music 1981

02. Joshua Moses : Africa (Is Our Land) (Joshua Moses 1978) p Copyright Control 1978

03. Talisman : Run Come Girl – Live (Taylor / Talisman 1980) p Recreational Music 1981

04. Restriction : Four Point Plan (Restriction 1983) p Unitone Publishing 1983

05. Black Roots : Tribal War 12” Mix (Black Roots) p Nubian Music 1981

06. Restriction : Restriction (Restriction 1983) p Unitone Publishing 1983

07. Joshua Moses : Pretty Girl (Joshua Moses 1979) p Unitone Publishing 1979

08. Talisman : Wicked Dem – Live ( Taylor / Talisman 1980) p Recreational Music 1981

09. The Radicals : Nights Of Passion ( John Carley 1980) p Copyright Control 1980

10. Sharon Bengamin : Mr Guy (Unknown 1980) p Unitone Publishing 1980

11. Black Roots : Juvenile Delinqent (Black Roots) p Nubian Music

12. Buggs Durrant : Baby Come Back(Home) (Errol Williams 1983) p Unitone Publishing 1983

13. 3-D Production : Riot (John Carley 1980) p Third Kind Music 1980

14. Talisman : Dole Age 12” Mix ( Joseph / Talisman 1981) p Recreational Music 1981

Tracks 1, 5, 11 originally released on Nubian Records
Track 2 originally released on More Cut Records
Track 3 and 8 previously unreleased Live Recordings
Track 4 and 6 originally released on Restriction Records 1983
Track 7, 10 and 12 originally released on Shoc Wave Records 1979, 1980 and 1983
Track 9 originally released on The Bristol Recorder 2 1980
Track 13 originally released on Third Kind Records 1980
Track 14 originally released on Recreational Records 1981

Track 1, 5 and 11 Engineered by UK Scientist, Recorded at The Facility, Produced by UK Scientist and Black Roots
Track 2 Engineered by Dennis Bovell, Recorded at Gooseberry Studios London, Produced by Dennis Bovell
Track 3 Recorded Live at Glastonbury Festival
Track 4 and 6 Engineered and Mixed by The Mad Professor, Recorded at Ariwa Sound Studios London, Produced by Restriction
Track 7, 10 and 12 Produced by Gene Walsh, Recording location unknown
Track 8 Recorded Live at Bath University
Track 9 Engineered and Produced by David Lord at Crescent Studios Bath
Track 13 Recording location unknown, Arranged and Produced by Ron Green
Track 14 Engineered by David Lord at Crescent Studios Bath, Mixed by UK Scientist, Produced by Talisman and UK Scientist

All tracks re-mastered by Steve Street, July 2010
All Rights Reserved

P c Bristol Archive Records 2010

Thanks to

Martin Langford, Steve Street, Sam Giles, Gene Walsh/Joshua Moses / Shoc Wave, Brendan, Des, Denison / Talisman, Jabulani Ngozi / Black Roots, John Carley, Rob Smith / Restriction, Adrian at Great Bear, Lloyd Harris / Chris Parker/Recreational Records, Alfredo / Nubian Records, St.Pauls Carnival Office / Steve , Thomas Brooman CBE / The Bristol Recorder People, Gary Chapple and “all the musicians who played on these tracks”.

Photo credits: Thanks to the original photographers and artwork designers with whom copyright remains on their work

Front cover image Beezer

Artwork by samgilesdesign@gmail.com

This album is dedicated to Mark Simpson and Trinity Hall

Bristol Archive Records, July 2010
www.bristolarchiverecords.com
email: info@bristolarchiverecords.com

Early UK Catalogues for Jamaican Music


Melodisc, Rio, Blue Beat, Ska Beat, Dr. Bird, Island, Pyramid, Sue

On a recent visit to see Phil Etgart a well known Jamaican music collector I was told of a wonderful story of how Phil, shortly after buying a collection of records received by post a packet full of Lists and Catalogues from the seller. A packet containing lists of releases by some of the rarest and now most sought after labels in the history of Jamaican music in the UK. I’ve always had a  love the ephemera releated to the music, hence Jamaican Label Art a site I started with another mate, Ian Causer, and it’s with great pleasure and Phil’s permission that I post these here for you to see.

Musical Train


Musical Reggae Train

Count Sticky    Train To Soulsville / U-Roy    Train From The West / U-Brown    Train To Zion / Observer All Stars    One Train Load Of Dub / Ken Boothe    Train Is Coming / Ethiopians    Train To Ska-ville / Big Youth    Train To Rhodesia / Junior Murvin + Dillinger    Roots Train / Pyramids    Train Tour To Rainbow City / Derrick Morgan    Reggae Train / Roy Shirley    Musical Train / Keith & Tex (Keith Rowe & Texas Dixon)    Stop That Train / Lloyd Williams    Black Man’s Train / Prince Buster    Mule Train / Prince Buster    Train To Girlstown / Charmers    Skinhead Train / Melodians   Last Train To Expo 67 / Tinga Stewart    Hear That Train