Tag Archives: song

Brochel to Arnish (Rush)


Rush is the name I give to any something I’m working on that isn’t finished, rough mix, demo, whatever, it’s like viewing a rush of the ongoing edit..  so.. anyway,

There’s a road called Calum’s Road on Raasay an island off the Western coast of Scotland, it’s one of the Inner Hebrides, a beautiful road made by one isolated man who was fed up with no one doing anything to get a road into his tiny village of Arnish, where at that point, he was the only person there living. It’s a tale, a story this road of Scottish independence, of Highland clearance and it’s evils, and of one man’s determination and strength. The road is a beautiful place on lots of levels, I’ve travelled it twice and wanted to try to write something that expressed my feeling for the man, his toil, the scenery and the journey, the mechanics of it, and somehow this happened, unlike anything I’d normally do, to my ear it sounds like a combination of William Orbit, Lemon Jelly, and some old blues fart (that’s me I’m on about!)

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Nigger Butler – (Too Much Youth) Inna Jailhouse – Record City


A tune a day keep Obeah away. << This is an occasional series of tunes that I think you need to have and to hold, and today I want to let you all know about a tune I keep returning to. A fine roots tune, with a strong version side, in the classic late 70s Roots style.

FullSizeRender 14This record was given to me a long time ago, when I was first setting off on my Jamaican music record collecting, by a dear friend, now gone, Charlie Reggae. It had no title, only a generic label, for the Record City Record label. A label which had very few releases. The first one on that label at that point I had seen. Discogs didn’t exist then and records were bought from mail-order homemade catalogues mailed to you each quarter year and not on eBay or online shops.

For a number of years I had no idea who was singing on it or what the title might be. I always called it, ‘Too Much Youth Inna Jailhouse’ as that is the striking refrain of the song. Because it was strong, and because even though I tried, I couldn’t find any info on it, it held a certain mystique that only an un-identified but quality record can.

Just recently someone identified the singer for me as Nigger Butler, otherwise and perhaps more politically correctly properly known as Rector Butler, who by the sparse information on the label sang on and produced and distributed the tune. A one man stop shop of Reggae production. I’d love to know who the backing band are, as the rhythm is strong and assured, but there is virtually no information about the singer/producer or his cohorts online, or I’d be copying and pasting it here for you to see.

As with a lot of great Jamaican music the only way to know the artist is to own and listen to their tunes, so much of Jamaica’s music was produced in virtual anonymity, particularly in the Golden era of the late 70s. However that’s what makes it ROOTS, music of the people, by the people, and why it has such inherent strength sonically.

Look, it’s not the greatest Reggae tune in the world, but it is a damn fine one, and you should be able to check it out on my next bigmikeydread reggae radio podcast soon. Check the section here on Musical Traces for track-listings. I’d like to share the tune with you here, but no recording of it exists online, yet.

© Murphy (mid Feb) 2019

 

London’s Burning


Youth and the art of ignorance – The London riots and the riots elsewhere of 2011. A Top 20 soundtrack to their misery…

Yeah I know I know, those that are old enough have been here before, and you’re all bound to notice the Jurnior Murvin track in amongst this little list. I just thought that we could all do with a soundtrack, it’s one way of softening the blow, though I don’t suppose it will be any consolation to the children and parents and good people everywhere being terrorised by the bunch of self indulgent thugs currently on the streets of London and other UK cities. This is a trite idea at best, but given the way that Murvin’s Police and Thieves became the soundtrack to previous unrest in our beautiful capital, an obvious one to author.

Top 20 Tunes to listen to with Police Sirens wailing in the wind?

Culture – Stop The Fussing And Fighting

Junior Murvin – Police And Thieves

Johnny Clarke & U-Brown – Work For Your Money And Don’t Grudge Your Black Brother

Benjamin Zephaniah – Riot In Progress

Sons of Jah – Breaking Down The Barriers

John Holt – Police In Helicopter

King Tubby’s – Big Youth Fights Against Capitalism (??)

Jah Stitch – Cool Down Youthman

Prince Buster All Stars – City Riot

John Wayne – Call The Police

Peter Metro – Police Inna England

Joe Higgs – Wave Of War

Val Bennett – City Demonstration

Niney The Observer – Blood And Fire

Tappa Zukie – Stop The Gun Shooting

Pama Dice – Brixton Fight

Al Brown – Ain’t No Love In The Heart Of The City

Barry Brown – Politician

Congos – Children Crying

Roy Richards – Summer Time

Lord Laro – The Rastafarian Love


Early tune mentions Rastafari

On Jamaica's Ken Khouri produced Kalypso label

Found this one recently, not in great condition, but plays okay and is interesting in that it features some nice Rasta style drumming and a strong Rastafarian theme throughout.

Here’s a link to the tune – Listen Here

Laro is a Trinidadian Calypsonian who recorded a number of tunes in Jamaica almost exclusively for the Khouri family at Federal. He is perhaps most well known to collectors for his Jamaican Referendum Calypso of 1961, this appears both on the Jamaican and Uk Kalypso labels. Laro still performs and is more widely associated with Trini Calypso, than Mento flavoured Jamaican Calypso.

Collecting Music In Modern Britain


I just finished an interesting book by a chap called Will Hodgkinson, called ‘A Ballad of Britain’ in it he traces music around Great Britain, as if he were a modern day Alan Lomax, collecting it on the modern day equivalent of a wire recorder (though it was lomax’s dad actually that used one of those). Though I think he missed more than one or two tricks along the way, it is most definately an interesting read, including a section where he visits Martin Carthy and Norma Waterson in Robin’s Hood Bay in N. Yorkshire.

I once met Martin and Norma at a restaurant in Oxfordshire, near Bampton where I had been dancing with the South Downs Morris. He, in a strange twist was interested in the hand held recording device I was using to record Francis Shergold’s side that Whitsun Bank Holiday Monday.

http://willhodgkinson.turnpiece.net/

Amazon (not the only place selling it, describes it thus)

In 1903, the Victorian composer Cecil Sharp began a decade-long journey to collect folk songs that, he believed, captured the spirit of Great Britain.A century later, with the musical and cultural map of the country transformed, writer and journalist Will Hodgkinson sets out on a similar journey to find the songs that make up modern Britain. He looks at the unique relationship the British have with music, and tries to understand how the country has represented itself through song.