The Ethiopian, Leonard Dillon dies


2011 claims another great Jamaican singer

Leonard Dillon ~has passed away…

Lead member of the Ethiopians and later a soloist as ‘The Ethiopian’ Dillon was at the peak of musical fitness in the Rocksteady and Early Reggae eras. Cutting countless tunes to slaughter all musical opposition for the top Jamaican producers of the time, notably for Coxsonne Dodd, Edward Seaga at WIRL and Sonia Pottinger, tunes like ‘The Whip’ and ‘Train to Skaville’ ‘Engine 54’  and later in his solo capacity as ‘The Ethiopian’ the truly heaven bound ‘When will be the end?’ Keep a close lookout for any Studio One tunes with the name Jack Sparrow attached to them too, for this is also Leonard Dillon in his earliest guise.

The Ethiopians were a popular act in the 69s Reggae boom in the UK and contined to be a firm favourite with Jamaican music fans the world over.

One of the true giants of Jamaican music he died after a long and protracted struggle with cancer.

Only last year the rumour mills turned and I myself had an obituary out on the web before we were all told to our relief that he hadn’t passed away. Graced with another year with his family, he will be sorely missed by all now that he has indeed passed away.

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Sonia Pottinger Reggae Producer passes away


Lady Pottinger passes away

Sonia Pottinger, grand lady of Reggae and for that matter Rocksteady (and with some little involvement with Ska too) has passed away, read about it here at the Jamaica Observer’s website.

Sonia Pottinger

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/entertainment/Sonia-Pottinger-remembered_8126254

She passed away on the same day as Keith Stewart of Keith and Enid (Cumberland) fame, and shortly after Gregory Isaacs a few days previously. All our heroes and the main movers in the Jamaican music industry are passing on. Sugar Minott earlier in the year of course too.

She recorded some of the greatest stars to come from Jamaica, Laurel and Bobby Aitken, Dave Barker, Dennis AlCapone, Ken Boothe, The Beltones and Culture, Bim and Bam, Stranger and Patsy, The Cables, and the Melodians, to name only a few. She also ran the catalogue of Duke Reid after his death from 1974 onwards, re-issuing some of the Duke’s biggest hits. Running labels like Gaydisc Gayfeet and High Note, her name is synonymous with Jamaican music.

Later she would defend her right to own the Treasure Isle catalogue in court.