The Ethiopian, Leonard Dillon dies


2011 claims another great Jamaican singer

Leonard Dillon ~has passed away…

Lead member of the Ethiopians and later a soloist as ‘The Ethiopian’ Dillon was at the peak of musical fitness in the Rocksteady and Early Reggae eras. Cutting countless tunes to slaughter all musical opposition for the top Jamaican producers of the time, notably for Coxsonne Dodd, Edward Seaga at WIRL and Sonia Pottinger, tunes like ‘The Whip’ and ‘Train to Skaville’ ‘Engine 54’  and later in his solo capacity as ‘The Ethiopian’ the truly heaven bound ‘When will be the end?’ Keep a close lookout for any Studio One tunes with the name Jack Sparrow attached to them too, for this is also Leonard Dillon in his earliest guise.

The Ethiopians were a popular act in the 69s Reggae boom in the UK and contined to be a firm favourite with Jamaican music fans the world over.

One of the true giants of Jamaican music he died after a long and protracted struggle with cancer.

Only last year the rumour mills turned and I myself had an obituary out on the web before we were all told to our relief that he hadn’t passed away. Graced with another year with his family, he will be sorely missed by all now that he has indeed passed away.

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RIP – Gregory Isaacs Dead at 59


Gregory Isaacs dies at his London home after a long illness

Truly Extra Classic

One of the greatest names in Reggae music has passed away this morning (25th October 2010), Gregory Isaacs, the ‘Cool Ruler’.

He was diagnosed with lung cancer some time ago. However strangely there are some other reports online saying that it was liver cancer that he had battled against.

Whatever the diagnosis, one fact remains. He was truly a superstar of Reggae music; taking that music worldwide on countless tours and spreading that music’s message and melody worldwide on countless recordings.

Night Nurse was of course his most famous outing, but classic songs like Mr. Cop, his cover of Dobby Dobson’s Loving Pauper and Poor and Humble didn’t just excite the Reggae crowd, it defined them.

Popularity

In the mid 1970s only two singers abroad and one other at home in Jamaica could rival or exceed Gregory Isaacs’s popularity, Bob Marley and Dennis Brown ‘a foreign’ and Jonnie Clarke ‘inna yard’.

The Supreme Stylist

His laid back style and effortless approach was well suited to the smoke-laden 1970’s golden era of Roots Reggae; and as the epitome of  solo singer and frontman, Gregory Isaacs inhabited the stage with a confidence that shone with what seemed to many like a cock sure self-assured arrogance.

The Cool Ruler – Photograph by Beth Lesser who owns copyright.

Born in the Ghetto

Like many of Reggae’s most succesful singers Gregory Isaacs was born in a Kingston slum in 1951 but managed through nothing but raw talent, desire, necessity and determination to succeed. Not only did he break the notoriously tough home market, but he went on the become one of Jamaica’s most loved performers and to have many hits there. Over and over again he proved himself in a country where it is said everyone is a singer. You probably couldn’t get a tougher audience, or more competition.

Over a long career

He started his recording career pre 70s and after a false start he hit with vocal group ‘The Concords’ who recorded for Rupie Edwards, and a very fine, crisp and clean harmony group they were, check them out if you haven’t yet heard them! Don’t Let Me Suffer is a great tune and one of the best Edward’s ever produced for anyone. (In this writer’s opinion.)

Wonderfully Lazy

Gregory’s own record label

Over time he honed his style until it sounded like he was exerting the absolute minimum of energy required to deliver his songs either to his audience or for the tape machine’s ferric oxide.

He had the sort of vocal performance that could at a stretch give rise to the fantasy image of studio technicians prodding Isaacs awake at the end of each take, or tape editors cutting the snoring off of the mix before mastering!

He often sounded wonderfully under-whelmed and gloriously lazy; like a man who couldn’t care less if you came to the gig or bought his music. Surely there has always been something dashingly attractive about anyone talented, who doesn’t give a damn.

Just remember though momentarily that this on the surface of it ‘apathetic’ approach is a dangerous game for Gregoy Isaacs to play; as having come from a Kingston ghetto and the associated poverty of growing up in such a place he must have had nerves of steel and sublime confidence that his approach, style and self direction was what would make him successful, and it did. Thank goodness. Otherwise, it could have been back to the slum.

African Museum

Gregory Isaacs recorded with many of the greatest producers to come from Jamaica – GG Ranglin, Rupie Edwards, Niney, Gussie Clarke, Harry Mudie, and Lee Scratch Perry, but Isaacs produced too, starting his label African Museum with then friend Errol Dunkley in the early 1970’s.

Dunkley and he had originally met in around 1969 when Gregory took Errol Dunkley to see producer Rupie Edwards. Isaacs and Dunkley went their separate ways only a few years after starting African Museum but the label and the later shop continued onwards in an effort to remain independent of other producer’s manipulation of Isaacs and his fellow artistes. He funded further releases on the label with further work for other producers.

In 1982 – and on….

When all was going well for Isaacs internationally he was arrested for illegal firearms possession in Jamaica and incarcerated there for 6 months. It transpired at this time that he was a Cocaine addict and was involved in drug dealing and the gangland of Kingston. Unfortunately for his many fans this affected his voice and of course, sadly, Mr. Isaacs health.

As time then passed his once lazy delivery began to sound energy less and extremely ‘nasal’ and those that knew his great work of the past mourned the loss of the Cool Ruler’s extra classic voice.

He claimed many times that his addiction to Cocaine was over, but rumours persisted.

Sadly missed – this time its personal

It was a real shock finding out that he’d gone today, I hadn’t heard any rumours that he was ill, though fairly close to the Reggae rumour mill; and so when I was told couldn’t quite grasp that we have lost both Sugar Minott and Gregory Isaacs in this year alone. Gregory however remains one of my all time favourite artists, and I’ll be shaking the dust off of Loving Pauper and listening to the I-Roy cut tonight too.

Sugar Minott passes away


Sad news coming in today that Lincoln Sugar Minott has passed away.

As yet unconfirmed by any direct source, the word is that he’d been ill for a time and passed away on the 10th July.

From Dave Hendley on the Pama Reggae Forum – http://s7.zetaboards.com/PAMA_FORUM/topic/8318245/1/#new

‘Just come off the phone from David Rodigan. Sugar died yesterday, details are a bit sketchy and unsubstantiated but he’d been ill for a little while.
Very shocked and saddened to hear this. I had lots of dealings with Sugar in the late 70s & early 80s & I always considered him a friend- He was a truly lovely guy and a hugely talented artist. Quite unbelievable news.’

It appears that he had problems with Angina and had a heart attack late on Saturday night.

A loss

I believe that what makes the passing of Sugar so sad is that he was only 54 and had in his short life helped so many people along the way. Staying amongst his people and in his community and guiding and nurturing new talent with Youthman Promotion his organisation. Some might argue that he and the Lone Ranger were virtually solely responsible for the revival and survival of Studio One during the 80s too, such was their effect on riding afresh the old and now classic rhythms of Studio One.

You only ever hear good things about Sugar Minott too, he was obviously a good man, not just a great singer.

Studio One – Back in Action?


C.S. Dodd

In-fighting amongst Coxsone Dodd’s family has held back the distribution and licencing of material produced at 13 Brentford Road since Coxsone’s death 6 years ago, in a recent settlement his son Coxsone Jr. has had his case held up, and hopefully this will allow everyone to get back on with business. Read about it here – http://www.caribdaily.com/article/286013/dodd-jr-relieved-case-settled/