Bogumil – Album Cover Art Super Bad More and Agains


Bogumil Says:

‘Hello again, so it’s time for another comment on your favorite off the awful cover art critic, Bogumil. How many of you already know that I’m a Polish gentleman who collects LP with works of art truly shite and puts them on here – ‘Traces Musical’ with permission for you all to enjoy.

Again, although this time I was recently on a new trip to England, where he focused on collecting in the south east of the country again and this time they have come up with some doozies! Namely, Will Conrad and West Lps (of which I hope at least one copy of the guideline in if I find a place), and the upper reservoir of the last Lp joyfullness see. Enjoy, as they say in the best Polish restaurant, as you begin to eat boiled carp fish.’

Will Conrad, wondering where it is in this sense, you know? Answers on a postcard please Bogumil, located near the Potato, Poland.
Read sign, tell me please?
Another cover of Lp by Will Conrad and the West, these boys have to be famous, so where are they now? Scraping the dung to a local farmer? Wonderful drawing skills.
Accordion band, or a mental escape people? You decide.
When a man has a florid face and too jovial way, it usually indicates that something is terribly wrong, do not you think? Leaning also, same angle guitar and tree and guy, work of genius!!
Wow, oh to be strong Polish moustacche man on the bus after the ceremony the girls after work drink.
We'll meet again, and I know where, at the Central facelift, contractors budget wrinkle in Warsaw.
Auntie Vera, wartime spirit. Much sexual activity in older ladies, no lie!
In Poland, every night is party night. I'll drink potato vodka all night ... all night!
Mrs. Mills was a good horse, and donkey, the most reliable and musically Showoff. Pissed, always.
Engelbert Humperdinck, really his name? He will soon be representing Great Britain in the Eurovision Song Contest ... Nil points for name and then lips that look like chicken's bum crack.
Have not I always thought Acker Bilk's name sounded like a man vommitting? In this case, you probably saw the cover of Lp!
Looks like they found the secret of fashion victims Garden Blue Peter!
Pobierz swoje dziecko tank top, masz pociągnął!

A final note from Bogumil

Rumors reached me that some of my words are getting confused when I use Google translate, it is unfortunate, but nothing I can do in this situation. I asked Google to improve the translation quality, but sadly to say that currently have no plans to even bother to think about Poland at all ever.

Please accept my apologies, and until next time, ma wspaniałe życie.

Bogumił.

Studio One Lp Cover Art Book from Soul Jazz


Collected for your viewing pleasure

Just out from Soul Jazz, most recent purveyors of all that is Studio One related in the UK (music and otherwise) comes this coffee table booky wook, collecting some of the covers from Studio One’s catalogue for your viewing pleasure, though if you collect the Lps, you’ll have a significant amount of the artwork already.

No surprise there then?

It’s nice to have and there are a few you may not have seen before, such as the Tabernacle Gospel Lp covers or the Sri Chimnoy Lp (now legendary as a rarity) but there isn’t a lot here to stun an enthusiast for the label. Frankly that’s been the case with most of Soul Jazz’s output of Studio One material musically and so it is visually, also.

Odd

They (SJ) I think have missed a complete trick, in that on occasion they mention the sleeve notes and quote from them, they could have included many more, for the quirky nature of them are well-known and often amusing or enlightening. Including the cover of the Lp Pirates Choice (which has never it seems been reproduced as anything but a muddy turdish greeny brown of a poorly registered example of what NOT to do if you are a Litho printer) seems odd too. There are more Lps they could have chosen from, with more to offer the viewer, casual or otherwise.

I hoped for more

There is no logic or rhyme to the choices made and to the inclusion of some of the more recent Lp covers, which have little or no individually distinctive style whatsoever.

The forward by Steve Barrow is little more than yet another introductory level run through of Jamaican music history, though generally accurate for all that and still an engaging read for the newly converted. Though it should be mentioned that no Mento was ever to my knowledge released by Tewari on Down-Beat, only on sister label Caribou.

 

Calypso Date! MRS LOML 503 12″ Mento Lp


Oh that smile!

Calypso Date – MRS Lp LOML 503

For those Mento mad amongst you here are some details that I hope you will find of interest. Click on the images for larger versions of the files, and in the case of the rear cover, readable text, though I will include that text here for all to see. The sleeve notes are unusually well written and include descriptions of the songs and their background history in some cases.

Details:

LP    MRS    VARIOUS ARTISTES    CALYPSO DATE    LOML 503    SMOL 105 1B    STANLEY MOTTA    JAMAICA    1950s

(anyone out there have a date of release, if so please contact me here at Musical Traces)

Sleeve Notes:

The most remarkable feature of this album is its variety. Here is represented the whole broad gamut of Jamaica’s music, the sly, ironic humour, the warm spontaneity, the carefree and gay attitude towards life that is so much part of Jamaica. This music is bred of the brilliant colour and contrasts that inspire the Jamaican troubadour; and out of it flows the endless, subdued excitement that life in one of the world’s most beautiful islands inspires.

In this album are Calypsos and Mentos. The Calypso is the generic ballad of the Caribbean, the song that is inspired by the life of the community – the young girl who lives gaily but not wisely; the house with the leaking roof. These are the creations of Calypsonians who vie with each other to create songs of humour, of double meaning, of perceptive wit. The Mento is the music of Jamaica, the solid, thumping rhythm of music that in its beat and texture is subtly Jamaican, as distinguishable to the tuned ear as is the difference between the Merengue of Haiti and the Samba of Brazil. And there are the other ageless songs, those that are chanted by workmen as they bend their muscles to rhythmic work saved from monotony by song, or the gay song of welcome when the pretty young girl comes to visit.

These are the songs and the sounds of Jamaica, ever exciting and interesting, that will become familiar and beloved as you listen to them. This is the music of a beautiful land, inspired by its ageless hills and white sand beaches, its gay, laughing people and the rhythm of its sun-bright days. This is the music for you on your Jamaican date.

The songs:

SIDE 1

Linstead Market – The ackee is an attractive fruit of red, yellow and black, and when combined with salted cod makes one of the most popular native dishes. This song tells the sad tale of a higgler in the famous market of Linstead, on the road to Ocho Rios, who fails to find customers to buy her ackees at Saturday market.

The Naughty Little Flea – The humble flea occurs in the songs of many countries. If you listen carefully to the lyrics you’ll chuckle at the rather unique situation in which the little insect found itself.

Hill and Gully Ride – A rousing shout song that is used by Jamaican workmen. It follows the pattern of many rhythmic work songs in its responsive form, and is a folk song of rather more antiquity than the calypso which has been popular recently.

Matilda (and) Gal-A-Gully – The first is a Jamaican adaptation of a Trinidad song, one in which a hardworking young man is deceived by a scheming young miss who lifts his money and takes off for Venezuela. The second is Jamaican, the plaintive comment of a granny who asks her grandaughter just why she is going to the gully…’A Whey you-a go a-gully fa’.

This Long Time Gal A Never See You – A happy song of welcome, the lyrics of which are self-explanatory.

The Little Fly – Anyone who has had to clean a mirror can appreciate some of the more irritating habits of the fly. This song is one man’s comment.

SIDE2

Take Her To Jamaica – This song has become a standard in Jamaica. It is sung by calypsonians on all occasions and gives very good advice indeed.

Kitch – Lord Kitchener is one of the finest of the Trinidad calypsonians, and this song recounts his experiences with a rather insistent young lady.

Dry Weather House – It seldom rains heavily in Jamaica, but when it does all the defects of a house that is suited to dry weather show up.

Healin’ In De Balm Yard – The balm yard in Jamaica is the gathering place of members of a primitive evangelical sect. To balm yard gatherings they bring their troubles and woes where these can be banished.

Limbo – One of the most exciting dances, the limbo is done to a repetitious song that is almost hypnotic in its appeal. Some of the excitement and verve of this African ritual is caught in this song.

Brown Skin Gal – A young lady is told to take life more seriously. Rather than spend so much time living the high life, she is told to ‘Stay home and mind baby’.

Click to see bigger...

‘Looking Back’ – The Jamaican Chart Hits of 1958 & 1959


Fabulous double cd charts the tunes that influenced and gave rise to so much Jamaican musical output.

Just been turned on to a double cd out this year (2011) from Sunrise records, which collects mainly U.S. Pop and R&B tunes that were charting just as Jamaica’s own recording industry was developing into the world dominating force it would become.

Though Jamaica released its first home produced and recorded single 78rpm in 1952, it was the era of Ska music during and post independence that popularised Jamaican music worldwide. In the meantime homegrown sound systems were playing American Pop and R&B hits, interspersed with some homegrown talent & Jazz.

This double cd aims to collect some of those tunes together, many which were the blueprint for future Ska instrumentals, early and later Reggae vocal outpourings and whose influence are still being felt today.

Sleeve notes

Though of course the sleeve notes suffer from being legible only to mice or studious men with thick prescription lenses, such as they are contained within a cd booklet, they are however extensive and an education in themselves. Those that are behind this release have most certainly not skimped on effort!

Tabu

It’s one of very few places (and the cheapest by far) that you will find ‘Tabu’ by Cyril Diaz, the prototype for the Gaylads and then of course Dennis Brown’s ‘Africa’.

Flavour

And if you want to get a flavour for the music that turned Jamaicans on at the end of the 1950s this is a great place to start, and sure beats trying to pick up and pay for US R&B 78s from the USA.

Respect goes to Musical Traces friend Phil Etgart who advised on the project and is quite obviously from the sleeve notes responsible for a good deal of the knowledge contained within them.

Here’s a track list:

HARRY BELAFONTE WITH ROB GORMAN’S ORCHESTRA    ISLAND IN THE SUN
LORD TANAMO    SWEET DREAMING
GENE & EUNICE    VOW, THE
RAYS, THE    SILHOUETTES
BOBETTES, THE WITH THE REGGIE OBRECHT ORCHESTRA    MR LEE
LARRY WILLIAMS & HIS BAND    HIGH SCHOOL DANCE
SAM COOKE WITH THE BUMPS BLACKWELL ORCHESTRA    YOU SEND ME
LAUREL AITKEN    NIGHTFALL IN ZION (AKA ROLL RIVER JORDAN)
CLYDE McPHATTER WITH ORCHESTRA & CHORUS    ROCK & CRY
ERNIE FREEMAN    DUMPLIN’S
JIMMY McCRACKLIN & HIS BAND    WALK, THE
MILSON LUCE WITH THE JOHNNY WALLACE SEXTET    DON’T BREAK YOUR PROMISE
LOUIS PRIMA WITH SAM BUTERA & THE WITNESSES    BUONA SERA
PLATTERS, THE    TWILIGHT TIME
BILL DOGETT    HONKY TONK, PART 1
FATS DOMINO    SICK & TIRED
CHUCK WILLIS WITH THE JESSE STONE ORCHESTRA    C.C. RIDER
NAT ‘KING’ COLE & THE FOUR KNIGHTS WITH DAVE CAVANAUGH’S MUSIC    LOOKING BACK
HUEY (PIANO) SMITH & THE CLOWNS    HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE
CYRIL X. DIAZ & HIS ORCHESTRA    TABU
LOUIS JORDAN & HIS TYMPANY FIVE    SHOW ME HOW (YOU MILK THE COW)
IMPERIALS, THE    TEARS ON MY PILLOW
PEREZ PRADO & HIS ORCHESTRA    GUAGLIONE
LITTLE WILLIE JOHN    FEVER
EARL GRANT WITH ORCHESTRA CONDUCTED BY CHARLES ‘BUD’ DANT    END, THE
LAUREL AITKEN    SWEET CHARIOT
COUNT OWEN & HIS CALYPSONIANS FEATURING EUTON GAYLE AND HIS BANJO    HOOL-A-HOOP CALYPSO
JIMMY CLANTON & HIS ROCKETS    JUST A DREAM
LLOYD PRICE WITH DON COSTA AND HIS ORCHESTRA    STAGGER LEE
COUNT OWEN & HIS CALYPSONIANS FEATURING EUTON GAYLE AND HIS BANJO    ISLAND IN THE SUN
PLATTERS, THE    SMOKE GETS IN YOUR EYES
FRANKIE FORD WITH HUEY (PIANO) SMITH & HIS ORCHESTRA    SEA CRUISE
EARL GRANT    EVENING RAIN
HUEY (PIANO) SMITH & THE CLOWNS    LITTLE CHICKEE WHA WHA
COASTERS, THE    CHARLIE BROWN
THREE PLAYMATES, THE    SUGAH WOOGA
WADE FLEMONS & THE NEWCOMERS    HERE I STAND
OSCAR McLOLLIE & ANNETTE BAKER WITH GOOGIE RENE & HIS ORCHESTRA    HEY GIRL – HEY BOY
LLOYD PRICE WITH DON COSTA & HIS ORCHESTRA    PERSONALITY
JACKIE WILSON    THAT’S WHY (I LOVE YOU SO)
BILLY HOPE & THE BAD MEN    RIDING WEST
LITTLE JIMMY SCOTT    I MAY NEVER (SEE MY BABY ANYMORE)
ERNIE FREEMAN & HIS COMBO    LIVE IT UP (AKA BEARDMAN SHUFFLE)
MIGHTY SPARROW, THE    DEAR SPARROW
LEE ANDREWS & THE HEARTS    IT’S ME (AKA WHAP WHAP)
WILBERT HARRISON    KANSAS CITY
PROFESSOR LONGHAIR    NO BUTS, NO MAYBES
ROSCO GORDON    NO MORE DOGGIN’
DRIFTERS, THE    THERE GOES MY BABY
JOHNNY & THE HURRICANES    RED RIVER ROCK
LAUREL AITKEN & THE BOOGIE CATS    BOOGIE ROCK
LOUIS JORDAN & HIS TYMPANY FIVE    G.I. JIVE
FATS DOMINO    BE MY GUEST
HAL PAIGE & THE WHALERS    GOING BACK TO MY HOMTOWN
HAWKS, THE    I-YI
LAUREL AITKEN    COME BACK JEANNIE
TERRY & JERRY    PEOPLE ARE DOING IT EVERYDAY
GONE ALL STARS, THE    7-11 (AKA MAMBO NO5)
FITZ-VAUGHAN BRYAN’S ORCHESTRA WITH VOCALS BY KENTRICK PATRICK    EVENING NEWS

http://www.sunspotrecords.co.uk/Sunspot_Records.html

In the wake of the R&B speedboat


Suddenly, what’s happened to me…

Recently I’ve beaten new musical paths and find myself away from the Reggae (for that read Jamaican) road that I was on, buying Mento which is on the outskirts of town and US R&B, which is a short flight away.

Normally what happens as I follow the ‘Reggae’ route, is that one ‘thing’ leads to another, one producer, one Studio, one label artwork, one whatever…. but I’ve ended up on a back road as far as Jamaican music goes and really need a new jumping off point…

One of my problems is that I have a very varied taste for Jamaican music and listen (and therefore collect some originals) from the early 50s through to the Mid 80s, with even a few tunes from right up to the last few years thrown in for seasoning. This has meant that I havn’t concentrated on any one label/producer/genre/ or era and somehow, this in turn, has conspired to mire my listening and collectdom in the potholes of said back routes to a musical nowhere’sville ….

So for a while I buy a few (expensive) Pama singles, then (expensive) Mento 78s (which I am still), some original (expensive) Rocksteady, I’m not picking up on anything that’s leading me elsewhere and I’m feeling a little bereft, losing my religion, it’s like I’m spurning the affections of my best friend, one I’ve had for a decade or more.

What should I do, is it a problem, do you have a suggested new turning to take me back to the interstate, the airport and thence to the tropical paradise once again? Or should I leave Jamaica somewhat in the wake of the R&B speedboat and indulge my desire to purchase only Atlantic 78s, mainly those with Joe Turner, Thurston Harris, Clyde McPhatter and Ray Charles on?

Cleaning Your Records? – A How To Guide, or or ‘the Toilet seat that played Punk’


How the hell do I clean the crap off this record?

I regularly visit a site called the Pama Forum where like-minded old fat and balding geezers (and some handsome younger types) discuss everything from rare Ethiopians sides to even rarer cuts to Golden Snake.

I recently asked a question about cleaning some of my records and here are those very same questions and the answers and then the ensuing discussion.

Finally as usual it breaks down into rudeness and suggestions of ideas for musical toilet seats, but before it gets quite that indulgent I think it makes for informative and interesting reading.

Many of these guys are full time record dealers and all are avid and very serious collectors.

Washing Tub Plates, Not Dub Plates!

Me

Believe it or not, and I know it sounds mad,… to date I have only ever cleaned records if needed as they come into me, and never since, some of the tunes I first collected or the most played ones are beggining to suffer from mildew and muck growing on wayward fingerprints or something like it…, one a Gregory 12″ I was playing last night to see if I wanted to include it on my next play list was skipping because of it and I know of a few others in similar states, I can’t avoid the obvious any longer, I need to get cleaning.

If a 7″ record is dusty before play I don’t use any sort of hand held device, preffering the ‘rub it pon mi belly’ method, which has seemed to suffice given the cleanliness of my T-Shirt (generally), Lps just have to suffer, even the surface area of my belly isn’t that big! . . . but, with this mildewing, growing muck on fingerprints issue, I need to get busy with the Cillit Bang or equivalent and I’m here to ask for youse guys suggestions…

If I list what my requirements are, perhaps you might share your knowledge and experiences..

1. Something to clean old 78s with, a product? A method? Must be safe and non destructive long term (also, what not to clean them with). Steve Barrow once told me that a mate of his used Fairy, hot water (not too hot) a bristle scrubbing brush, and left them to dry in the plate rack!) really???!!

2. Something for Lps, 45s and 12s to restore them if second hand and mucky/old muck and even, is there anything that shifts that oily crap on so many Jamaican represses? (ie, the Dealers’ and eBay Emperor’s best time saving friends)

3. Something for maintaining generally, ie, where things are clean(ish) to keep them clean and preent this ‘growth’ I am finding, which is probably a result o where they are stored (ie the attic, and no particularly to Phil I say, and yes it’s VERY upsetting, I do not currently have an option, – small house). I want something that will work easily and quick, as sometimes I only discover the need as I’m cuing up the next tune..

4. Further recommendations, a Cleaning and anti static brush, Isopropanol Alchohol, the PVA glue clean method?

Basically I’m wanting to put a little kit together that will maintain my collection, with as little effort (and expense) as possible.

Thanks all in anticipation of your help…

mikey Mike Murphy

Musical Traces Blog
J.L.A.
Studio Idler / Johnny Clarke
Bigmikeydread Reggae Radio
mike@orangestreet-webdesign.com

Door Peeper

IMHO forget all the fancy machines and solvents.
Fairy in warm water (fully cover the label) run round in the direction of the grooves with a small block of acoustic foam, rinse in clean warm water and stand to air dry in a record rack.
That’s been my method for 20 years now and I’ve clean every record that comes through here.
Nasty sticky bits can be cleaned off with Surgical Spirit first.
I’ll now wait for Martin to disagree!! Great big lumps of it round the back…………..
http://www.reggaereggaereggae.com

enthucol

1. Something to clean old 78s with, Steve Barrow once told me that a mate of his used Fairy, hot water (not too hot) a bristle scrubbing brush, and left them to dry in the plate rack!) really???!!

Thats the method Joe Broussard is seen using to clean 78s in ‘Desperate Man Blues’

Quote:
2. Something for Lps, 45s and 12s to restore them if second hand and mucky/old muck and even, is there anything that shifts that oily crap on so many Jamaican represses? (ie, the Dealers’ and eBay Emperor’s best time saving friends) 

3. Something for maintaining generally, ie, where things are clean(ish) to keep them clean and preent this ‘growth’ I am finding, which is probably a result o where they are stored (ie the attic, and no particularly to Phil I say, and yes it’s VERY upsetting, I do not currently have an option, – small house). I want something that will work easily and quick, as sometimes I only discover the need as I’m cuing up the next tune..

Warm water a tiny spot of washing up liquid (I mean tiny) in a glass on warm water and a tooth brush works for me, for more stubborn marks (Grease/glue etc) cigarette lighter petrol or Isopropanol Alchohol again with a toothbrush (Preferably not the one you use for your teeth!) and dry with a soft towel, same method works for mould spots etc, but do not get the labels wet!

Quote:
4. Further recommendations, a Cleaning and anti static brush, Isopropanol Alchohol, the PVA glue clean method?

See; Cleaning records with wood glue

Mick H

The tepid soapy water works best. And I agree about using other agents for really bad records, but dilute with water.

Jmatherton

Most records will benefit from immersion in tepid soapy water as recommended above. I use Ronson lighter fuel (squirt it on, rub off with hanky or J cloth using circular motion) for tougher stains, and isopropwhatsit to get rid of real clag.
BUT NEVER NEVER NEVER use the isothingy alcohol on 78s – I did once and it takes the surface right off, leaving them a dull matt grey.
I don’t know if EMI still market Emitex cleaning material but I suspect not.

Matty J

IMHO, unless you have something that really gets into the grooves, you’re only doing half a job.

My method is soak ’em in the bath in warm tepid water with a trace of surfactant (fairy, bubble bath, anything like that). Certain labels bleed colour and should not be soaked, but 95% are completely unharmed by a soak.

Get a new paintbrush, either real or quality plastic bristle, and ‘paint’ a bar of soap. Not cheapo plastic brishes as the bristles are larger and have angled sharp ends that might possibly cause groove damage.

Hold the record and run the bristles point first round the record in the opposite direction to playing for about ten ‘strokes’, you should get a small lather forming. If, at this point you flick the foam off the brush onto the basin, you may be quite surprised at how off-white it has actually become, hence my initial observation.

When both sides are cleaned, rinse under the hot tap and drain off in a plastic or hot powder coated vintage record rack, but do not allow to dry completely.

Finally use some toilet paper folded into a pad to dry off the remaining water and polish off the surface to remove prints. Once the paper becomes damp, it won’t remove surface prints, so fold over a new layer and continue. Dab any moisture off the labels, don’t rub.

Allow to dry in free air. Reserve the paintbrush for future use, do not allow the wife to Dulux the back door with it.

The benefits of using this method are best possible sound, in that everything that can be removed from the groove is removed and the surface of the disc is restored to its best possible lustre and prints are effectively cleaned off. The one potential down side of this is that you also clean out the scratches, so a deep groover that had previously been partially filled in with mud may sound worse.

I’ve been doing this for 20 years or so, and this often improves the playability of records purchased from dealers that look reasonably clean. I clean pretty much everything I keep in this way, and most of the pricier stuff I sell, although I don’t sell very often. Records cleaned this way don’t develop mould spots, although it’s important that the labels are allowed to fully dry before sleeving in any poly-lined inner or outer.

I have an ultrasonic bath as well (I worked for 9 years for a company that made them), but I don’t use it as it is (even) more fiddly and time-consuming and does not produce better results than the paintbrush method described above.

Also worth mentioning is the use of label-remover on records. This must be the Limonene type as made by DeSolvIt amongst others.

I recently picked up a copy of the Warrior 12″ re-cut by Johnny Osbourne that had been kept in a taped sleeve and one side had sellotape glue all over the first 12mm on one side. This wasn’t removable by the water method above so, after testing the label remover on a worthless Top Deck single and finding that it didn’t erode the surface or audibly degrade it, I used the label remover with the paintbrush as described above, and the sellotape glue lifted like magic from the grooves. Listening to it or looking at it, you’d never know that it had been virtually unlistenable 5 minutes beforehand.

I was at one time thinking of making a machine to automate the cleaning process, but never got round to it.

Matty

Edited by Matty-J, Nov 11 2010, 12:38 PM.

http://www.ideasfarm.podomatic.com http://www.bluntbeats.com

Johnny Dollar

I had read you should take a mix of disstilled water and alcohol. The distilled water is needed because of the chalk in normal water, which can lay down in the grooves while drying. The alcohol makes shure that the record drys fast without arrears.

Any opinions to that? i have never try this, but i think the fact of the distilled water is plausible.

Rude Pete

Johnny Dollar
Nov 11 2010, 01:01 PM
I had read you should take a mix of disstilled water and alcohol. The distilled water is needed because of the chalk in normal water, which can lay down in the grooves while drying. The alcohol makes shure that the record drys fast without arrears. 

Any opinions to that? i have never try this, but i think the fact of the distilled water is plausible.

That’s what I use…. isopropwhatsit* diluted with de-ionised water….

* isopropyl alcohol

Dubmart

If you haven’t got a cleaning machine you really don’t know what you are missing, yes the above methods “clean” records, but they are absolutely inferior to a vacuum based machine and an enzyme based cleaner, a cleaning machine is an essential item for anyone who collects records seriously, you can’t cut corners!

With regard to 78s the number one rule is to avoid solvents.

There are already a few threads on this if you do a search.

Nov 11 2010, 01:01 PM
I had read you should take a mix of disstilled water and alcohol. The distilled water is needed because of the chalk in normal water, which can lay down in the grooves while drying. The alcohol makes shure that the record drys fast without arrears. 

Any opinions to that? i have never try this, but i think the fact of the distilled water is plausible.

Tap water varies depending on your location, (mine is full of limescale), but it all caries impurities, I use purified water, it doesn’t cost much more than distilled.

Me

Thanks so far all, interesting how we have all created our own methods, sort of seperately and together at the same time…

I knew the avoid solvents issue with 78s.

One reason for asking you guys what you think is to cross check my current methods and think about better ways to do stuff, in my case mianly cleaning old stuff just bought and full of crud.

One of the suggestions above I tried and have stopped, namely using any brush capable of cleaning off any grime on 45s or indeed Lps, I find having done run off groove tests that a brush, particularly a toothbrush abrades the surface with small marks, this has to degrade sound reproduction. Vinyl’s just too soft I think for this sort of treatment.

In short 78s are really very robust, and having started collecting them more I am amazed at how poor the surface can look, and how good the sound quality yet can be, the grooves are very deep. Vinyl is not as robust and I worry that my/our efforts at cleaning them could be cleaning dirt out in the short term, and yes they’ll immediately sound better, but actually we could be degrading the record that sits under that dirt pre-clean to some extent.

Also, though I use it, I also have doubts and worries about using toilet paper. I have noticed that toilet paper, designed to rapidly degrade in water (for obvious bye bye the sewage reasons) breaks apart quickly and leaves minute fibres in the grooves, this surely can’t be good practice, unless you clean them out later of course with say a final clean of Iso Alchohol. ( I don’t do this though)

I have also used Paper towells to avoid the quick degrading of the ‘ toilet paper method’ but think (best guess) that kitchen towell is more abrasive than toilet paper. though it leaves less fibres behind.

Towells? – Similarly, I can’t help but worry over this method too, they’re not soft enough in this household, the wife can’t stand Lenor!!

I have used toothbrushes and very hot water (no not boiling), with generous Fairy liquid on 78s with excellent results, avoiding water on any labels (45s, Lps or 78s), though finding that labels don’t seem overly bothered about getting a little water on them. Making certain to rinse off any residue of the Fairy liquid, rinsing in clean water, directly under the tap avoiding the labels. The water is good in our area, so not too much mineral to worry about (I think!).

My method on Lps and 45s is to get a bowl of hot water, drop two small (and I mean smaaaaaaallll) drops of Fairly or similar in, stir, and to dip the toilet paper (yep the one I’m not sure about) into the water, running in the direction of the grooves, a number of times, checking the slight resultant froth on the edges of the paper for grey, an indication of dirt. Then once done using more paper in clean water, or running under the tap carefully to rinse. then drying off either by pressing down onto kitchen roll, or wiping with dry toilet paper, though I’m now avoiding this method for the fibres issue mentioned above.

ONE OF MY BIGGEST WORRIES IS – Are there any truly long term affects on vinyl by something like Fairy, ie, we only know in the short term that there seem to be no ‘issues’. Long term Fairy rot is a future I dont’ want… also are Alchohols truly safe in the long term, any Chemists amongst us?

Also, when cleaning dirt off using a method that implies scrubbing or movement of any kind you are then abrading the surface for a short time with the very stuff you are trying to clean off, a little like creating a very mild wet and dry sandpaper and rubbing it over your records. However short term this is, surely it too must have some affect, and on records that you really care about, or feel in some way a custodian of, in that they are truly rare. This worries me too. Mike Murphy

Musical Traces Blog
J.L.A.
Studio Idler / Johnny Clarke
Bigmikeydread Reggae Radio
mike@orangestreet-webdesign.com

Rude Pete

I use lint free cloths to apply my solution, and then a final rinse with de-ionised water and air dry.

Door Peeper

Vinyl is only a kind-of plastic in the end and we happily smear Mr Sheen or other gunky cleaners all over car bumpers and table tops so I’ve never been too worried about a bit of Fairy especially as I always rinse well.
I never get bog paper near records as not does it break down very fast when wet but is made from very poor/cheap/recycled paper and very fibrous thus leaves tiny hairs on the record.

upsetter fc

The key to dish washing soap for records is a non-ionic sufricant, basically shampoo. It’s desigined to rinse off and will not leave a film like soap. Toothbrushes can be used on 45s, but only soft-bristled and don’t “scrub” the 45. I only use the toothbrush to spread the Ivory soap and water which helps the brush loosen the surface dirt. Drying is done with a washcloth, since it absorbs and holds water.

The Library Of Congress has a webpage on record preservation.
And here is an old usenet article on cleaning 78s. Tighten Up Brooklyn
Needs a new home
Rescheduled Tunnel One radio show on WNYU for May 11. 9-10:30 EDT.

Dubmart

Mike Murphy
Nov 11 2010, 02:42 PM
ONE OF MY BIGGEST WORRIES IS – Are there any truly long term affects on vinyl by something like Fairy, ie, we only know in the short term that there seem to be no ‘issues’. Long term Fairy rot is a future I dont’ want… also are Alchohols truly safe in the long term, any Chemists amongst us? 

Fairy, although great for cleaning your dishes is far from ideal as a detergent for records, they add all sorts of things to it and unless you are rinsing extremely thoroughly, or using a vacuum you will be leaving residue behind.

I’ve yet to see any evidence that dilute isopropyl or similar solvents are strong enough to attack PVC or release the plasticizers, etc., and know that some people use industrial strength solvents without apparent damage.

I use an enzyme based cleaner because it is better than either solvents or detergents, though there are occasions when the other approaches are the best option.

One other thing, pre war 78s can be made from all sorts of ingredients, so if anyone has a pile of Blues they feel the urge to clean, be very, very careful.

Matty-J

Well, I’m sure we all individually think we have the best method, so there’s not much more to be said on that score unless we’re going to do some scientific record contamination, clean records using the different methods, and then some blind listening tests to sort it out – anyone up for it !-)

My two comments would be:

Yes, toilet paper does leave small fibres behind, but only really ‘decomposes’ or sludges up if you’re using the posh stuff for all those of you with sensitive botties. El cheapo, like Asda’s pastel shades works perfectly well and will hold together excellently, you do have to shop around to get the right stuff. Kitchen towels are usually rubbish and surprisingly water-repellant to start with, so they don’t dry really effectively.

The fibres that are left behind are easily cleaned off using a standard dry cleaning pad, like the old Musonic or Stanton types, or if you’re really particular (tee-hee), a Groovac (groove-vac) will be fine. In any event, a clean dry record means they’re not going to stick around and even your stylus will remove the remaing few without damage. By the way, properly doped black vinyl is much more resilient than shellac and is less easily damaged.

Toothbrushes are useless for cleaning anything other than the flat surface. The diameter of the brush is considerably greater than your stylus, and it won’t therefore penetrate the groove and remove any of the crud that is causing stylus deviation and resultant noise, hence my suggestion regarding real hair brushes or quality plastic paintbrushes.

Matty http://www.ideasfarm.podomatic.com http://www.bluntbeats.com

Me

Matty that’s interesting regardin your brush filament diameter point, and point taken, I’ll be trying it now, also wondering what that enyme based cleaner is you use Dubmart? I’d like to try that as it seems a very good option.

Also, given the mention (Upsetter FC)of preferably using an easy rinse non ionic surficant, could you indeed use Shampoo do you think? what do you use?

I’ve found Groovac’s entirely useless, at least i did 20 years ago…

Door Peeper
Nov 11 2010, 03:08 PM
Vinyl is only a kind-of plastic in the end and we happily smear Mr Sheen or other gunky cleaners all over car bumpers and table tops so I’ve never been too worried about a bit of Fairy especially as I always rinse well.

Though, really we dont expect our car bumpers or table tops to store audio and reproduce it at quality over any length of time, or at all for that matter…

Make a nice art project though, ‘the curtains that played Bach’, or ‘the Toilet seat that played Punk’… Mike Murphy

Musical Traces Blog
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Door Peeper

Indeed not, but the basic process is the same for moulding a car bumper or stamping a 45.
I’d like my bog seat to play ‘Here We Go Again’ or of course the old school playground josh ‘Yellow River’. Great big lumps of it round the back…………..
http://www.reggaereggaereggae.com

Dubmart

I use L’art Du Son cleaner, a small bottle costs £30, but will make up 5 litres of fluid depending on your preference.

Door Peeper

Being tee-total and knowing nothing about alcohol ‘L’art Du Son’ sounds like a bottle of posh French wine to me!

Fang Sheng

http://www.verygoodplus.co.uk/showthread.php?t=21250&highlight=glue

jmatherton

With reference to DP’s musical loo seat:
…or ‘Royal Flush’ by The Skatalites, ‘Jericho Chain’ by Rolando Alphonso, ‘Stop That Strain’ by Keith & Tex or perhaps something by The Floaters?
I’m intrigued by the reference in a previous post to a “worthless Top Deck 45”. Which one would that be, pray?

Me

Nice Stop That Strain,, perfect… and yes even scratched to crap a Top Deck single must surely be worth something, I’d buy it just to have one on the label, as of yet I do not own one yap produced original.

Skajam 66

I use velvet to clean mine. First I spray on isopropyl alchohol and work the record around in a circular fashion. You can feel when the velvet pile engages into the track. Then I do the same with distilled water and a different piece of velvet. Finally I dry them with a soft cotton cloth.

Uncle Fee

Yo,

All very interesting methods…………….me, i just chuck ’em in the washing machine or dishwasher…….. :sc:

Bless Up
Fee :cool:

Aeon23

Mike

I posted these a few years back on here thought I’d revive them for the new members of this forum

Traditional Record Cleaning Process
Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Now you know why they are called plates :bgrin:

Madame Streggae

I remember these images. Brixton, wasn’t it?

Aeon23

Where else 🙂 in the UK that is

Madame Streggae

Old Barry over at Downbeat Records could be seen doing this too.

enthucol

but generally in the store rather than on the pavement

postscript

The above is intended as a helping hand to those who want to keep their audio media in tip top condition, though, on second look it also appears to be a warning to all.  Collecting records can get to be a full time affair!

Thanks finally to all that contributed…. happy collecting… believe it or not, I’m pretty sure my facination started with this little beauty below in the late 60s and early 70s. Quality was pretty bad, tunes to be found for it somewhat limited, but… you could scrub the hell out of the records without ruining the sound reproduction at least!

I consider that this was my first ever record player...

Mouth to Mouth – Gallery of Dolls


All Mouth and No Trousers

The following is just my opinion, this is only one persons opinion, this opinion does not impinge on you having an opinion that differs. (Please read comments).

This record was found in a charity shop a few weeks ago, I bought it because it looked interesting. It looked interesting but it didn’t sound interesting; in fact it sounded derivative and flabby. So I sold it.

In my opinion it’s got to be the best example I’ve ever seen of record collector’s self inflating hype. The only thing anyone seems to know about it, was that some guy, who many thought an authority, once said in a book everyone is meant to have read that it was rare and exceptionally sought after. I say make up your own minds about music and it’s intrinsic worth, or you may end up with a record collection full of expensive records that you never want to listen to. I have a few like that, in fact I have a few hundred like that… in fact I have a copy of something by Musical Youth somewhere, did you know that Jackie Mittoo was involved with that band… blah blah bla bl bl bla blahhh…

The buyer asked me if I had any further information about it, I didn’t, only what I had listed in my eBay description from the site Worthless Trash.

So to surmise –  the guy buying it didn’t really know what it was, the guy on the informative website didn’t really know what it was, I didn’t know what it was and I’m guessing that the guy who recommended it in his book hadn’t heard it, or he wouldn’t have recommended it.

To add – Now that this post has been up for a couple of days and garnered some interest, one ex member of the band has been in touch (see comments below) and it appears that I have upset people with my own opinions and frankness, I have now toned down the above article, removed the MP3 and wish to make certain that people know that I’m only expressing my personal opinion. It is interesting to me that I heard the tunes with open ears and with no awareness of their near mythic reputation, if you’ve never heard of, or listened to the tunes before I’d like to hear your opinion.

Subsequently, the MP3s were added to the blog on the Worthless Trash site and it seems that more than a few of the comments there currently support my opinion that the tune isn’t really very exciting.