Tag Archives: essential

Nigger Butler – (Too Much Youth) Inna Jailhouse – Record City


A tune a day keep Obeah away. << This is an occasional series of tunes that I think you need to have and to hold, and today I want to let you all know about a tune I keep returning to. A fine roots tune, with a strong version side, in the classic late 70s Roots style.

FullSizeRender 14This record was given to me a long time ago, when I was first setting off on my Jamaican music record collecting, by a dear friend, now gone, Charlie Reggae. It had no title, only a generic label, for the Record City Record label. A label which had very few releases. The first one on that label at that point I had seen. Discogs didn’t exist then and records were bought from mail-order homemade catalogues mailed to you each quarter year and not on eBay or online shops.

For a number of years I had no idea who was singing on it or what the title might be. I always called it, ‘Too Much Youth Inna Jailhouse’ as that is the striking refrain of the song. Because it was strong, and because even though I tried, I couldn’t find any info on it, it held a certain mystique that only an un-identified but quality record can.

Just recently someone identified the singer for me as Nigger Butler, otherwise and perhaps more politically correctly properly known as Rector Butler, who by the sparse information on the label sang on and produced and distributed the tune. A one man stop shop of Reggae production. I’d love to know who the backing band are, as the rhythm is strong and assured, but there is virtually no information about the singer/producer or his cohorts online, or I’d be copying and pasting it here for you to see.

As with a lot of great Jamaican music the only way to know the artist is to own and listen to their tunes, so much of Jamaica’s music was produced in virtual anonymity, particularly in the Golden era of the late 70s. However that’s what makes it ROOTS, music of the people, by the people, and why it has such inherent strength sonically.

Look, it’s not the greatest Reggae tune in the world, but it is a damn fine one, and you should be able to check it out on my next bigmikeydread reggae radio podcast soon. Check the section here on Musical Traces for track-listings. I’d like to share the tune with you here, but no recording of it exists online, yet.

© Murphy (mid Feb) 2019

 

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Earth A Run Red – Richie Spice


A completely essential single to have and to hold.

So this is the first of a new ‘series’ of ‘tunes’ that I in my infinite pretentiosity consider essential to have and to hold, to own, to rest easy ‘pon the record shelving.

It won’t just be Reggae music, but anything that I include, but anything that is pure essential listening, but more than that essential to have, to hold, to be physical with (let’s get physical, physical, let me hear your body talk…), none of that Spotify or iTunes shit, none of that ‘I got a collection of 20,000 tune dem, only to find out that .. Im’ got 20,000 Mp3 deh!! .. pure fuckery .. chaw….

This is/was a pure and strong new Roots anthem, ethereal lyrics, solid, meant and  meaningful, forward moving, a pleading anthem against violence and the culture of black on black crime. More so though, just a beautiful almost acapella from a smoke laden larynx, pure genius  ++ lyrically, this is one to stop the dance but still kill the sound ++ spiritually.

lyric selection, without objection…

I hear a next youth dead yeah

Hey watch the places you walk and mind
The way you talk
Watch out fi the vampire who will sneak up in the dark
Watch out for the big time thief who claim sey that them smart
Stop bringing the crack and the gun to mash up the youth dem heart
Earth a run red
Songwriters: Richell Bonner / F. Pitter / L. Corniffe
Earth a Run Red lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group
Heretical Heartfelt Article
Murphy © Musical Traces 2019
Respect.

Bigmikeydread Reggae Radio – These are a few of my favourite things. Part 3


129 Bigmikeydread Reggae Radio – These are a few MORE of my favourite things

July 28, 2013 11:03 AM PDT
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129 Bigmikeydread Reggae Radio – These are a few MORE of my favourite things Pt3

The continuation of favourite tunes.. my part 3 for you,.. simple as.

Tracks may include..

1.Tommy McCook – Moody Ska
2.Dennis Walks – Drifter
3.Dave Bartholomew – Monkey Speaks His Mind
4.The Itals – Ina Disa Time
5.Junior Byles – Pitchy Patchy
6. Chantells – Waiting In The Park
7.Junior Soul – Hustler
8.Wailers – Stepping Razor
9.Honey Boy Martin – Dreader Dread
10.Lone Ranger – Now The Gate Fly
11.Simple Simon – Honour Your Mother and Father
12.Eek A Mouse – Ganja Smuggling
13.Junior Dan – Look Out For The Devil
14.Johnny Osbourne – Gangster Sound
15.Ethiopians – Band Your Belly
16.Gregory Isaacs – Loving Pauper
17.Wailing Souls – Mr Fire Coal Man
18.Johnnie Clarke – Golden Snake
19.Ebony Sisters – Let Me Tell You Boy
20.Johnny Osbourne – Truths and Rights
21.Junior Parker – Feelin’ Good

You can donate to Bigmikeydread Reggae Radio here – http://bigmikeydread.podomatic.com/ look down the right hand side and hit the Paypal button.
Your donations are the ONLY funding the show receives and are what keeps it going! – THANK YOU.

You can hook up with the show and Mikey at the Bigmikeydread Reggae Radio Facebook Group – http://www.facebook.com/home.php?sk=group_5364049933

Thanks for listening, and come back soon for the bestest in Jamaican music, chat, sillyness, then and now. – all the best – Mikey

And you can read about interesting stuf on Mikey’s Blog at – https://bigmikeydread.wordpress.com/

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Thoughts on Rockabilly and Sun Records.. 5 points to ponder upon?


I’ve been getting into Rockabilly for a short while..

And I have some thoughts about what I’m hearing.

Now, I’ve been into music in a big way all my life and I’m getting good at recognizing the next listening and collecting sensation as it approaches. I still love my Reggae, but for a while 40s and 50s Rhythm and Blues and then late 50s Rockabilly has been featuring heavily on my Mp3 player, cd player and more infrequently on the turntable/s here at Murphy Towers.

Just recently having listened to Warren Smith’s Ubangi Stomp and Miss Froggie I purchased Essential Rockabilly – The Sun Story on the cheaper than cheap One Day Music label. It strikes me that you can hear some interesting stuff on it. I have listed five of them below in order of interest to me.

1. Elvis Presley was trying to cover the bases with his first release ‘That’s All Right Mama’  b/w  ‘Blue Moon’ (of Kentucky). Interestingly he seems most comfortable singing the Crudup classic, rather than the country number Blue Moon.
On the country/bluegrass tune he sings in a lower register superimposing a character on the song that isn’t like anything you’ll ever hear again. He’s playing, pretending he’s country, giving it some, hamming it up just a touch. Listen to it, check it out and you’ll see what I mean. In the first few bars you’ll not even be sure it’s him if you listen with open ears.

Of course this isn’t anything that isn’t already know. But you can really hear it on the shellac, it’s there audibly, history in the recording. Elvis on his first attempt and record release was trying to find his feet. Sam Phillips was trying to cover the angles by putting out a two sider, one R&B tune and one Country; in the hope that if the Black crowd or God help 50s ‘ society’ the teenagers didn’t like the Bluesy number their white and parental counterparts might prefer the 4/4 re-working of Monroe’s classic ode to Lunar tint.

2. It’s a good thing that Roy Orbison developed that lonesome high sound of his, because frankly at this stage of his career he was on a wrong ‘un. Orbison sounds like all the rest, there is not a great deal to distinguish him from the crowd of singers. In fact he sounds pretty weak at times. Orbison you sucked big time, but you did Okay in the end, for a speccy four eyes.

3. Charlie Feathers is good and needs more listening to, write that one down in the notebook. He’s quite obviously a full on redneck.

4. Johnny Cash is about the most mature temporally transcendant sounding artiste that Sun had. There is a developed confident, ‘I’ve made it already’ sound to Johnny’s output that impresses heavily. Listening to him, even more so than Elvis you are certain that out of all the artists you are listening to, he was the one who was going to make it big.

5. A lot of Rockabilly is badly played and amateurish at best (but great for it), and many of those lauded as great guitarists of the Rockabilly age wouldn’t have been fit to tune Jimi or Jeff’s Strat.

 

Oh… and 6. just for fun.. Jerry Lee Lewis has the fullest and most hypnotizing energy of all of those I’ve listened to so far, and yet, he’ll worry you on record, let alone up close and personal. Christ I’d be scared to rub him up the wrong way. He sounds like a man who’d shoot first and wouldn’t ask any questions whatsoever.  Dangerous.