Mark Professor – Oystah Card


Oystah Card – Tune.. review..

Mark Prefessor, out now, buy it..
Mark Professor, out now, buy it..

There’s a new tune getting spun at Murphy Towers, ‘Oystah Card’, a fun uplift of Jamaican Jerk Mixed U.K. pepper sauce with a dash of humour, a pinch of patois, and a suspicion of hit about it.

And top hole of all… it’s by someone I’ve seen perform on many occasions about the London Reggae revival scene, namely at Tighten Up a night that has morphed about Town for many a year. Mark Byer aka Mark Professor.

It’s got cheek, he rides the riddim like lizard pon a limb, it has a certain Britishness, it’s light, but it’s heavy (ish). It reminds me of that quirky nod and knowing wink that Kilburn and the High Roads had, that was thusly imparted to Suggs and his lot of Mad Men.

Word is Roddy loves it too..

In my role as Bigmikeydread Reggae radio supremo and self inflated fat person people send me ’nuff demo, ’nuff tune, ’nuff stuff, ’nuff already. Mark Professor didn’t, Mark Professor just put together with his crew a tune worthy of spondoolick donations from my very own personal wallet, albeit a Paypal purchase on eBay. Further word is that it’s all but sold out, not a wonder to this here one.

Hear it below..

 

Collecting Music In Modern Britain


I just finished an interesting book by a chap called Will Hodgkinson, called ‘A Ballad of Britain’ in it he traces music around Great Britain, as if he were a modern day Alan Lomax, collecting it on the modern day equivalent of a wire recorder (though it was lomax’s dad actually that used one of those). Though I think he missed more than one or two tricks along the way, it is most definately an interesting read, including a section where he visits Martin Carthy and Norma Waterson in Robin’s Hood Bay in N. Yorkshire.

I once met Martin and Norma at a restaurant in Oxfordshire, near Bampton where I had been dancing with the South Downs Morris. He, in a strange twist was interested in the hand held recording device I was using to record Francis Shergold’s side that Whitsun Bank Holiday Monday.

http://willhodgkinson.turnpiece.net/

Amazon (not the only place selling it, describes it thus)

In 1903, the Victorian composer Cecil Sharp began a decade-long journey to collect folk songs that, he believed, captured the spirit of Great Britain.A century later, with the musical and cultural map of the country transformed, writer and journalist Will Hodgkinson sets out on a similar journey to find the songs that make up modern Britain. He looks at the unique relationship the British have with music, and tries to understand how the country has represented itself through song.